The Solar Fraud:
Why Solar Energy Won't Run The World

By Howard C Hayden

Vales Lake Publishing, LLC, ISBN 0-9714845-0-3

There is one tragic flaw in this book, which is that it will not be read by those who ought to read it. Otherwise it is a masterpiece. Most sceptical critics of the environmental energy movement will have done enough calculations to satisfy themselves that it is based on illogical fantasy, but here it is all laid out in stark simplicity. The book  is designed to be readable by anyone of average intelligence who has been trained in elementary arithmetic, though it would probably be too difficult for the likes of Michael Meacher, the British Environment Minister. The author wisely confines frightening things like equations to the appendices.

All the shibboleths of the alternative energy advocates are taken one by one, cruelly dissected and shown to be empty. Entertainingly, the relentless logical drive of the text is interspersed with quotations from the usual suspects (the Browners, Erlichs, Fondas etc. of this world) which in the context expose themselves as vapid verbalisations.

The author neatly skips the Global Warming minefield by working out scenarios for a 5șC rise and a 0șC rise, both of which still expose the claims as nonsense. A very interesting point that is forcefully made is that the whole deception is kept in the air by a multiplicity of units (calories per square centimeter, BTUs per square foot per minute, cords of white oak per acre per year, homes etc.) which results in one of the most powerful expositions of the advantages of the SI system of units that has ever been made. When they are all reduced to common units (watts/m2) the whole lot fall into place and the nonsense is self evident.

One point that jarred slightly was the division of power into electrical watts and thermal watts. It is easy to see why it was done, since those who have not progressed to the second law of thermodynamics cannot understand that one represents freely available power, while the other is severely constrained by Carnot's law. A watt is a watt is a watt. If, however, that is what is required to bring light to the benighted so be it.

This is a wonderful, perspicuous and entertaining piece of work. Sceptics will love it and the establishment will ignore it.

© John Brignell 2003

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